It's the news that's dominated the world of social media for months and now marketers are bound to feel the effects of Facebook's dreaded algorithm change.

We're finally back after a little break with another episode of the Inbound After Hours podcast. In episode 28, we dissect what the 'meaningful interactions update' from Facebook means in general, as well as the impact it's going to have on marketers and how to combat it.

In the HubSpot-related segment, we look at HubSpot introducing their marketing starter package and provide our thoughts on the new offering.

There's also the inaugural edition of "Bruce's Price Is Right (but for search volumes)" featuring Les Dennis, Michelle Obama, fried chicken and more.

Inbound After Hours Episode 28

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Full transcript to follow:

- Hello, welcome to Inbound After Hours. Long return, long awaited return.

- Yeah.

- For nobody, probably.

- Yeah, so it's been a while since we've done one of these.  Got myself, Paul, Content Manager. Rikki, Director.

- Yep, hi.

- And Andrew, Senior, Head of Inbound.

- Yeah, hello.

- And we got David there behind the camera and the mics.

- So, yeah, where have you been? Rikki, what have you been up to?

- Why have we not done a podcast for?

- Yeah, why?

- Yeah, I don't know, it's all me apparently.

- You're following Mark's trick of, so I'll ask Andrew and then go Rikki.

- Yeah, (laughs) I guess we've all been busy, personal and work wise really, haven't we? Work wise, obviously, the agency's growing. Most of us have changed roles and had to embody members of staff, stuff like that. And then personally, we've had our second child, so that's kept us busy. Paul's joined that club, had his first.

- I've just gotten my dog.

- He's been getting a dog. So we've all been trying to bring new people into the world in various formats. So we've been pretty quiet, but we're dedicated back on the weekly now, aren't we?

- Yep.

- After a break?

- David's logging us, every week, we're doing it so.

- Absolutely, yeah.

- Happy to be back.

- Definitely.

- And we got beers in the office again.

- Yes, can't go wrong with that.

- So we've changed things a little bit. We're gonna talk about, bring back the news or stories we've seen, something interesting this week. Well, we've got what we're talking about this week, so then HubSpot related.

- Yeah, I think, when I was looking for things that have changed in the last week or so, the one that's been top of my mind recently is HubSpot introducing their marketing starter. Not particularly something we'll be using as an agency as it doesn't fit the profile of our clients, but I thought it was quite interesting for a couple of reasons. It's $50 a month, you can do 5,000 emails a month for that. You get the things you used to get in the old HubSpot, marketing free, I think it used to be called, like lead flows and lists and reporting. But by introducing that email into the game, I think that broadens it
for the amount of people who would use it. And alternative to a lot of major platforms like MailChimp and things like that.

- So before, you could have free CRN, couldn't you, before?

- Yeah. And you could have a free marketing product, but it wasn't anything.

- Basically to push people into CR and those things.

- Yeah.

- I think you could do lead flows and all the bits.

- You couldn't send marketing e-mails, could you?

- No, and that was a big restriction on it, so without saying it was worthless, it was nearly there. But now for just $50 a month, having the ability to send e-mails, and a decent amount of e-mails for that price.

- For the people that are looking, that is a lot, isn't it?

- Yeah.

- For that small, one man band or small businesses.

- And enough of a database. In fact, enough of capacity, 5,000.

- Yeah, absolutely. Hey it's a surprise, because I didn't know this was coming, I saw it pop up on the sort of feed, we all sort of share stuff at the same time when obviously there's something new, so it all sort of pops up.

- We'll come to that. (laughing)

- No, yeah, it was interesting.

- I think the thing of, to me, what I was chatting on Twitter a little bit the other day, is, what is HubSpot now, they've branched out into obviously starters and marketing product it's CRM, it's sales, it's service, it's website from a toolset viewpoint. But now my mindset, HubSpot was always a mid-market product moving slightly towards enterprise because that had been a lot of the noise, now it's moving downstream same time into this sort of free stuff, some $50 and stuff, is it turning into, will you do everything for everyone, which is ground as a marketing person. I would like to market that. I don't think that works for me. What do you think about that?

- Yeah, I agree with the sales stuff, they've realised they have to up it, and they have done, they've grown the reigning into sort of that mid-enterprise, trying to make it as easy for sales force users to come down and have everything they had, slightly cleaner version of that, and yeah, I
think it's a funny one really, not sure, like, from an agent perspective, it's not as much value tools, but I'd be interested to see the people, they're sort of bottom, and the pro and the basic one, the big jump for them.

- Yeah.

- Six months ago, when they were sort of using it, and getting it, and hoping to grow into that pro account and now they could, and now HubSpot won't let them, want to downgrade, and
there might be people at the bottom of that level, wanting to go down now, and so I'm sure there's a lot of research behind why they're doing this, and I presume it's a sort of a market share thing that a lot of people who did just want to do e-mail are happy on MailChimp, didn't want, it's just, again, opening that gap a little wider to get those people in as well.

- So you get the full, you get full insight you can put CTAs in e-mails and get the analysis.

- It's not quite as good as that, you can't use the design manager, so you can't custom make e-mails; it comes pre-loaded with what they call the drag and drop, which is actually a similar thing to MailChimp, you get a, put a hand to there, and a bit of content here and there. That feature's actually quite nice and they're putting that into the main products.

- So that'll be nice for the MailChimp fans,

- It's been our high point.

- E-mail chains is pretty good.

- E-mail chains is good, yeah.

- I think that was always the users were probably, what's this, because it was very rigid, so I think they're trying to get the, uh, you know, it's a saying, it's the typical thing, isn't it, the stand-alone e-mail or the MailChimp's are big on e-mail, the best out there, the ones that do the landing pages are technically better, but hopefully they can get close to that and the other stuff that makes it better all over.

- It's going to make some difficult mark to message the HubSpot team. And we've seen it ourselves, when people used to ring a few years ago and say I've got HubSpot, you knew they had, probably or enterprise marketing product, now we've got HubSpot could mean free CRM, I've got sales,
I've got marketing, I could be paying 50 pound a month, I could probably, don't know, we've sold some like 25K a month, so the price range is sort of features that the people who've got HubSpot is now completely different, so it's not just, I'm on HubSpot anymore.

- Yeah.

- It's what are you on, what level are you on, I think it just becomes quite a complicated message.

- Yeah, I guess.

- Interested in seeing how that pans out.

- The marketing message for us, and only we care about this, (laughing) how to use it, what to do, just adds another level of differentiation to that, so they're not going to have all the features, or they're
not going to be ready for certain things, and I guess we're still focused on that mid to high market, but it's interesting to see what happens from a lead perspective, and what's going to start coming through.

- It'd be good to try HubSpot inbound when it's had, say, three, four months traction, I guess what they're hoping is people upgrade, so, come on the start they go to the basic, they go to pro, I mean you're talking 20-some odd percent, multiple uplifting costs, be interesting to see how many people go through that, but see how it goes. It's a really interesting movement, like you said, I wasn't expecting, so we'll see how that plays out.

- Cool, so, big change. Another big change since the last time we recorded one of these is the Facebook algorithm change earlier this year, and the meaningful interactions update.

- Catchy name.

- Yeah. (laughing)

- Yeah.

- Not quite rank-paid. So Facebook's changed. Obviously marketers are aware, but I think even civilians, they're aware, there's a big TV campaign for saying, basically saying sorry for Cambridge Analytica. (laughing) You didn't come here for this. So yeah, they're shamed about the change. So yeah, that's the topic for this episode. Facebook algorithm then. So, reasons we've got, they want to put forward friends and family, meaningful interactions, but what does that mean for us, what we offer?

- My first thought, away from work, was do I really want more stuff from friends and family?

- That's why I got rid of Facebook!

- I know! When I was thinking about it, we haven't chatted about this before, and I think, is that just me being anti-social, or are other people like me, thinking that's probably not a good thing for me, that I'm going to see more of that stuff.

- I think, in and out of having Facebook and using it, I think going from, I did get to a point of treating it like Twitter, where I sort of followed businesses and brands because I actually wanted that content, instead of, like, people, that I sort of vaguely know from school, and I think everyone sort of shifted that way, so it was more, being in marketing, sort of more content consumption stuff, but seeing that drop away, and I think the shift to the different media types, of videos just everywhere, just horribly stupid videos and memes, and it just went crazy that way, and then they try to change it again, seems like the noise is around the sort of business posts, and the drop in the organic reach of business posts, that's what we're talking about, right, because our clients use it, and they think around different ways of using it, but there's some huge companies that really have been impacted by it, and that whole business model has been around that, and it's sort of shut that down pretty quickly.

- What interests me about people applying for jobs here, the costs of that algorithm change, the, the whole company was built on organic Facebook, and it's been decimated,

- Yeah.

- And people are losing their jobs, and that business model's going.

- I wonder what they're like, their bibles and stuff, that model's --

- That was a whole side of the business, Facebook audience.

- Yeah.

- It is quite interesting to see how it's changed. I know, I was watching the Gary V. thing last night, which ties into it, how he went all in on Twitter, and then the Twitter algorithm changed, like years and years ago, and all of that time and effort in being the first, one of the first people to a million followers and all that,

- Just gone

- And he's just like got a smack in the face, and move on to the next platform.

- He's going all in on Twitch now. You see that the other day?

- No, I haven't seen it.

- You know, he put up a post, literally said I'm going all in on Twitch, so I think he's seeing that as a next one, so he's going to run out and do that.

- Whether he's genuine or not, he's got the right attitude, that these are going to change, and I've just got to move where it changes, and just take it on the chin, make sure I'm not reliant on one channel anyway, which is, I guess, what a lot of these companies did wrong, I'm on the Facebook gravy train for the rest of my life.

- From Facebook's point of view, they still do, I remember a talk we went to last Inbound, last year,

- I was just about to say, the last Inbound, that's all they said,

- Facebook, Facebook, Facebook.

- Use Facebook, do Facebook ads,

- But also, their subsidiary, apps.

- Oh yeah.

- So WhatsApp and Instagram, the top 20.

- It's a lot of Messenger wasn't it, last year?

- Yeah.

- But the one, I think the one before that was just use Facebook, all your users are on it, pick out CO down to whatever, PA, they're all on it, that's what we should be going on. And then this comes along,
and then...

- Interrupt there, what I was going to say is still on it, so I have my Facebook news feed, I'm a traditional Facebook user, but I love WhatsApp, that's my life, in WhatsApp.

- Yeah, you're in the ecosystem.

- And I love Instagram.

- Yeah, so the data about me is still there in Facebook apps.

- Yeah, yeah, I think that's probably the cynical reason of them probably doing this, is, a lot of articles you read are on how to get around it, is pretty rubbish advice, but it's--

- I got that you got some tips that you want to slag off.

- Yeah, that's of that, I think it's rubbish, but probably a bit true.

- Tis if you still want to play in that market.

- It's pay to play.

- Lot of that.

- Yeah, it might be now, it's less so your big content page and offers, or your landing page, it is your actual content is going to end having to pay to get that out there. Sorry day. But yeah, that's how it's going isn't it?

- I think some of it, the bits I've read, there still are ways to combat it, or to keep playing in that arena, or lessen the damage and sort of the big ones that I took away from it is obviously algorithm, the big change that they're going to try is obviously prioritising friends and families, but the major algorithm
change is around interaction and commenting, they are massively more heavy weighted than they ever were. They were weighted before. A lot of the old weighting was around how many people clicked it, clicked through to the article, people watched the video, they call it hover, stay on that piece for a bit of time. Those have been de-prioritised and the ones that have been massively prioritised is comments and reactions and shares, and um--

- The big weightin'

- Yeah, huge weightin'

- I think what's interesting in that, as well as penalising share bait,

- Tagging, you use like this, to be fair, I know we did our snap poll of three, and Facebook had got this wrong, compared to their half a billion user base, but these three agreed they got it wrong, but that's one I massively agree with, I hated those, there's no value at all, was it, the type of crap or whatever it is and you get a billion.

- You got a lot of them then, shit. 

- I got a lot of YouTube, probably the most in this office.

- Well, I've put in your two's, last FIFA match.

- What?

- You What?

- This one's keeper's got--

- I think someone's keeper did score on Drew.

- Yeah, it wasn't mine.

- To be fair, I did it in the next game against Joe as well, so--

- That don't count though.

- Why?

- Two people who've never played FIFA, versus someone who plays every time.

- In truth, that's the draw though. It's like the World Cup, who I get drawn against, it's kind of like, I got Panama and countries that haven't --

- Yeah, I'm the Panama of FIFA.

- Yeah, Joe picked up an Xbox control and thought he was on a PS2, so that's what you're--

- When he asked me what the buttons were,

- Yeah, I know.

- I'll get Mickey proud. Or other type-bait stuff, yeah, completely agree with that, I hated that, and I'm glad that's de-prioritised massively.

- I think it makes for, just as a user it makes for a nice content to read, not just that individual post is better, because you have to put more thought into it, but your feed's better, because very post isn't tag someone who does this, or tag someone who does that, or

- Gotcha, yeah.

- I think even like, headlines and stuff will have to be better, so repetitive social posts are gonna you're not gonna get comments, so you're gonna have to be more creative, more genuine. I think it's similar to what we've found with blogs and Google, when ranking, just quality content is the ones that will rise to the top eventually.

- I think I read on Buffer, which is the number one ranking piece on Facebook algorithms, I'm sure we all had to redo it before we came in, but they had a phrase which put nicely is, marketers are always looking for ways to make their content the most attention-grabbing, now they're looking for the ways to make it the most conversation starting. I think if you look at your plan from that perspective, that's a good way of putting it, and we've noticed with the companies we work with the ones who have genuine audience, genuine engaged audience, and we've got some that are really good on that, and if it still works really well when you've got real conversations going on, and that's hard for marketers because content, typical blog posts and stuff, that doesn't start conversation, so you have to have a slightly different strategy on your social than your content a little bit, or change your content.

- Strictly for inbound topics as well. The content we do, supposed to be evergreen, it's not supposed to be timely, but what all gets people chatting on social media is something timely.

- Yeah, that's right.

- I think it's a big role for people in our position to fill with the difficulty of finding stuff that's timely, that's going on at the business, or whether it's an event, or, you can do that as agencies.

- I wonder what would happen if you post in each campaign that are super timely, and conversation's started, gets people to your feed, where the evergreen stuff is you regularly posted, and you're using those as hooks to bring people to your page and your feed. It's going to influence that, isn't it?

- We've been having chats, haven't we with the client who's come on after the change, and one who's been with us from before to now, and just coming up with ideas together of what social can be done at their end, or what content can produce that's timely and we focus on evergreen stuff and merging that together. But I imagine, being a social media agency, limit it...

- Yeah, and our guy at social media, that's a hard place to be, isn't it?

- So what are the other things you think--

- I mean, the most immediate one that I noticed straight away was just the prevalence of the groups I was in, so I'm only in a couple of groups, but I'd say my feed is completely dominated by those are the things that are coming up all the time.

- Groups, not pages.

- Yeah, definitely. I mean, I guess it does get more interaction and engagement to the group, generally, and that's why it's serves into the top in this algorithm change, but there's a definitely an overnight shift in my feed to what it was to groups, it's been really prevalent. And you've seen a lot of people therefore start groups, a few of our clients who relied on social, they've moved into groups. They still do the page stuff, but it's just another channel, and I think you've got to treat it that way. It's not, my page has moved to a group, your page still needs to do what your page does, but now you've also got a group, that's an extra channel for you to manage.

- We got a group.

- Oh yeah, good plug. So we noticed the change, and we started a group, it's called Inbound After Hours, obviously after this podcast, link below, maybe.

- Yeah.

- See how we do, but yeah, I mean, that's based around conversations like the one we have in this podcast. People got questions, people want to pass on information about Inbound, there's not really an amazing group out there for Inbound conversation, so we thought we'd get that started on Facebook so if anyone wants to join it --

- Pretty much what we took, right in the office, we took into there, as a sort of secondary place to be, so any --

- We want your opinions as well, we don't want --

- Yeah, anything we find outside of this podcast, and we're sharing internally, new ideas and techniques that we're working on, we'll pop into that group, so you'll get access to that, before plugs go out from our side, it's probably more sort of live content really, and it's not just us that are posting in it, it's all of this lot, and a lot of our clients. So yeah.

- And I might be biased by the groups I'm in, but the ones that, the ones that seem to work well for me are ones that are actually well-moderated, and it may be because I've left the groups that aren't, but the ones that seem to be organised and moderated, they seem to do well. I know a few I've joined,
you have to fill in like a little application, ours does that, it just checks you're actually an Inbound marketer before you join.

- I've done, found out with personal research when I was joining other groups groups of pregnant women, as part of my researching, yeah, I couldn't get in, 'cause I'm not a pregnant woman.

- Yeah, so, it worked, and I guess that's good for the group. (laughing)

- Yeah.

- So yeah, I think, I don't know if that's an algorithm thing, but I think it's certainly wise to have rules, moderation, ways of verifying people upon entry, having someone moderate it to get rid of selling, as soon as people start replying with my product, or let's try, people get wise to that very quickly and leave.

- Yeah. That really goes back to the content on the front end of Facebook if you will, getting shared, being personal or relevant. Cool, yeah, so Facebook algorithm. A couple other things to go through, stuff we've been looking at this week, something rather than news external, like Hubspot. I thought we'd go to just share what we've been working, or what we found interesting. Hopefully, anybody picks this up in Facebook, in the group or on Twitter, can share what you've been working on. Big one for me this week is planning out this month's, finalising this month's content, booking it in with the team. We've got our first hundred blog month, this month. I think when I joined a couple years ago, we are down at one point to four blogs a week.

- Equally as difficult. (laughing)

- Yeah for different reasons. So yeah, that's quite a proud moment, getting those hundred blogs.

- I guess a challenge is for you to write one of those blog posts I see everywhere, what I learned from writing 100 blog posts in a month.

- About time, I've got 100.

- I've got 100 too, yeah, I guess so, but for clarity, it's not just Paul who's out writing 100 blogs, but, uh, yeah, you've got to read them all I guess, and--

- Yeah, I just thought that was a big mark.

- It is.

- It shows the growth we've had since last year, so, um, yeah, what about you, Rikki?

- Big thing for me, from a learning perspective, I've been working on a data box this week. If anyone's not aware, a data box, one of the XP--

- Is that for casting?

- We have, you can go back, a guy called Pete Kaputa, he's CEO there, used to use HubSpot, he's created a product, or him and his team created a product which allows your self business reporting. The great thing about it is, it obviously integrates your HubSpot, which got our attention, but it also integrates well the other data sources we tend to use, good about that fix type stuff. So we've been using it for quite a long time, myself and Andrew did a refresh of all of our client reporting on it, so we've been really deep in it. What I found quite interesting, particularly this week, is the ability to add together multiple data sources and stuff is a big change for us. We've got some clients who have five or six websites, maybe language, geography, whatever it is, and to give a good overall picture of how they're performing without really macro-ing up your Excel duty and all that. Data box proved a really good way of doing that and well above things, just like what's on across the five signs, just looking at down to the new contacts from not offline. So it's just every little detail that we report on, but multiplied across various, various websites. I quite like doing things that I've enjoyed, and it's a challenge for us, so if there's anyone listening who has similar challenges, probably a good place to start and have a look.

- What about you?

- I been playing around with workflow the last couple of weeks, so, figuring our agency workflow for the processes, our continual learning journey. We've got some good sort of base ways we do things, but I've been messing around with that, particularly on webinars and how to automate that, and create a good webinar workflow for a client, which is quite fun. I've then found, just, something I've not used before, but the web hooks side of it, so you're triggering things like trials in apps, outside of HubSpot, without needing an integration is pretty cool so I've just been playing around with that. It's nice to hover dive and find little new things, there's always stuff.

- We're both proud of expanding at the rate it's expanding.

- Yeah, it's fun.

- You'll always find something new, even it's not new and you've just come across it for the first time, it is good to find those little things, isn't it?

- We don't, have we chatted about workflows before?

- I think we've done a very overall, custom workflow, how to structure it and things like that, so we can make time in the show as well.

- I was thinking more of a, whether it's worth an update as well, because I know we've changed.

- Yeah, definitely.

- Workflows and tactics.

- Yeah, I agree, the big ones to figure out and stay sane.

- That's a title, isn't it?

- What's that? (laughing)

- How to stay sane and do workflows. If you know the answers, let Andrew know.

- Yeah I could do with that.

- When we've been chatting with clients we've been consulting now, workflows, I think a common thread, a common question from clients is sort of, I think I've set it up right, but am I doing the right thing?

- Yeah

- Yeah

- What it's meant to do. I think people are like, I've done my content, I've got my pitch, I've got my lead-in, my workflow is set up, but like, I've done, now got my lead, and I just look at it, and wait for it, and it's just like, focus on that now because it is doing something, that'll tell you a lot.

- And the other thing you've worked on this week, is a brand new feature.

- Yeah, drum roll. (drums)

- A game.

- Yeah, game time.

- What's your game called?

- So, it's called Bruce's Price is Right. Built for search volumes.

- Snappy as a title.

- Yeah.

- It describes it perfectly.

- Yeah, it's what it is.

- So we've never tried this before, so let's see how it goes

- Hopefully this will be on your screen soon. So yeah, quick run down.

- What's the rules?

- Rules are, I'm gonna share certain terms words, stuff you know, and you've got to guess. We'll start off with the search volume, and you need to decide whether it's higher or lower.

- Okay.

- Classic approach.

- Versus each other, yeah?

- Us two versus each other.

- I mean--

- You wanna keep score?

- The score should appear on the bottom.

- As if by magic.

- Yeah, but you can't do that now.

- No, no, eventually, you guys need to remember who wins.

- Okay.

- Okay, yeah.

- What we playing first, to five?

- Worldwide search volumes, UK, US?

- Let's say worldwide.

- We've got worldwide audience, so makes sense.

- That works.

- Hiya George in Uganda. (laughing)

- Okay, cool, so we're going to start with Facebook algorithm.

- Oooh.

- Topical, so the...

- Higher!

- Whoa, whoa, whoa (laughing) so that's 1,300 searches a month.

- Lower than I expected.

- So um....

- So that's the baseline.

- Yeah, so we need to go to the next.

- I guess the only people searching are people who are in digital art.

- Maybe.

- We don't know what the next term is.

- It's coming up.

- It's coming up.

- Don't worry. (laughing)

- I'll do 50/50.

- I'll go for it, higher don't know what it is. Okay, next one.

- Cheese and ham sandwich.

- There you go.

- I know--

- No doubt for me, that's higher.

- Gotta be higher.

- Yeah, definitely, it's got to be.

- Ooh, what!

- This is outrageous!

- How many Google how to make a cheese and ham sandwich.

- That's not the term though, is it?

- It's not how to make one, it's just cheese and ham sandwich.

- Who types that? Apart from me. (laughing)

- Fucking hell.

- There you go.

- We're kind of getting it though.

- That's the game. See, you're all into it now, aren't you?

- Okay.

- Okay, closing this.

- That was lower. Next one, Inbound 2018.

- How many of them are having ham and cheese sandwiches.

- Lower.

- This month?

- On average.

- On average.

- Lower.

- Lower?

- Lower, 50. Yeah.

- Okay.

- No wonder you're speaking. (laughing). One more.

- One more, come on.

- Hats for small dogs.

- Hats for small dogs.

- The world we live in, that is higher.

- Higher, it's got to be higher.

- Absolutely.

- Oooooh!

- Oooooh!

- We're so bad at this game.

- We don't have any clients that sell hats for small dogs, luckily.

- It'd be clean, you know.

- Hats for small dogs, okay.

- Next.

- Les Dennis

- Les Dennis

- He's got to be more,

- 40 himself, yeah?

- It's got to be, hasn't it?

- Fucking 27,000. I don't know why.

- Les Dennis is smashing this game.

- I think it's all the sort of trashy magazines.

- Okay. What's he been up to lately?

- I don't know, I had to search his name to get the volume, so,

- Okay.

- Takes all sorts.

- Yeah.

- Two two.

- Oh no, two two, okay.

- So now, Michelle Obama.

- Higher, it's gotta be.

- Every time you say that, it's not! (laughing) Don't give Paul clues.

- No, no, no, I don't know.

- I don't know. (laughing) I don't know.

- Don't even need to look.

Okay, I'll go lower if you're going higher.

- Okay.

- I think Les Dennis is more popular than Michelle Obama.

- The same. (laughing)

- That's not an option! Nothing for a pair in this game. (laughing)

- How are they the same?

- I don't know, ask Google.

- Okay. That's my next question.

- That's your next Google search.

- Les Dennis, Michelle Obama the same.

- See, they're all marked.

- Oh yeah, I gotta.

- It's good to know I can choose the same option now as well.

- Yeah, you could.

- That was a curveball.

- SEO

- SEO

- Going from Michelle Obama to SEO.

- Higher.

- Lower.

- Okay.

- Things just got interesting.

- Higher. Three two.

- You're in the lead.

- Intense now.

- Yeah.

- HubSpot.

- Lower.

- Lower.

- How is HubSpot higher than SEO?

- I don't know.

- They are smashing the brand in. Well-played. Little round of applause for HubSpot there.

- There you go, well-done HubSpot.

- Yes.

- Okay, next up.

- What is my domain authority?

- What is my domain authority?

- What rounds?

- That's the best way I could describe that, DA.

- Lower.

- Lower, yeah. Definitely lower.

- Okay.

- Paul's still one in the lead.

- Got one to go. Is that what we're playing by, first to five?

- We're not far off the end now.

- Oh we're playing some more questions.

- We'll get through, yeah. You'll know when it's come to the end. Don't last forever. (laughing)

- Can you eat glue? (laughing)

- I'm going to go lower.

- I'm going to go higher than 90.

- It's lower, 10.

- Oh, luck of the game.

- Horrid, horrid mum's probably said.

- Is it four, oh?

- Yep, it's a strong one, yup.

- How many left?

- Inbound Marketing?

- This might be the last one before--

- (whispering) Bonus round.

- Oh yeah?

- Higher than 10?

- Yeah.

- There you go.

- How well business is going. (laughing)

- We should start selling glue, edible glue. Okay, bonus round.

- Hey, this is a tie, it's not staged.

- It is a tie-break.

- We're not clever enough to stage this.

- So this one, you need to guess the exact number of searches.

- Okay, closest wins?

- Closest wins. Okay.

- Can you go over? Or like, there's no sort of like--

- Yeah, yeah, it's just closest wins.

- Are we guessing on the same one?

- Yeah.

- Okay.

- Okay.

- Fried chicken.

- Fried chicken, something that's well-known in our office. If you get this wrong, Paul--

- Higher.

- No, it's a number.

- You need to guess the number.

- Oh. (laughing)

- But higher, fat chance.

- 32,000, am I saying higher?

- Yeah.

- 54,000.

- What's the middle of that?

- I'll have to get back to you on that.

- Paul, you Tweet.

- So 32, 54, what's in the middle.

- Here it comes.

- 18, Paul wins.

- Good win.

- What do I win?

- Uh, pride.

- Why'd you say good? You're like, Paul wins. (laughing)

- Cause it's fried chicken.

- All right, well played, well-deserved.

- Well-done Paul. (clapping)

- More mail to you.

- Thanks. I like that.

- That was good.

- Another game next week?

- Yes.

- From someone else?

- No, I like it.

- I just made a couple search terms. There's more.

- More search terms, yeah.

- All sounds good.

- Thanks for hosting that.

- My pleasure.

- Cheers, time for another beer I think, so must be down to finish, we've nearly finished the beers.

- Yep, yep. See you next week, guys.

- Thank you.

- Bye

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